The work of Erwin Olaf

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf
People say paintings, photographs or art pieces have the power to alter our emotions and transmit what the artist feels or wants you to feel. Today’s Photography feature could be a perfect example of this. Dutch Photographer Erwin Olaf’s captivating work combines different elements like beautiful 50s retro tones, sets, wardrobe and furniture! an admirable use of light and the somehow depressing, dark and twisted expressions (or lack of) his subjects. Check out some samples of his work…

Born in1959 in Hilversum (the Netherlands), lives in Amsterdam (the Netherlands)

Erwin Olaf’s art visualizes implicitly the unspoken, the overlooked, that typically resist easy documentation. Olaf’s trademark is to address social issues, taboos, and bourgeois conventions in a highly stylized and cunning mode of image making. With his razor-sharp aesthetic intuition, Olaf purposely conceals his themes, so that the viewer has to accept the initial concealment in Olaf’s photo series. Yet in the end, his unconventional style never misses to deliver dramatic visual and emotional impact.By taking care of the scenic and lightning design, and the utmost perfect composition in his typical, immaculate ‘Olafian’ way, together with his passion for flawlessly conceiving scenarios, Olaf vividly captures the essence of contemporary life.

Mixing photojournalism with studio photography, Olaf emerged on the international art scene in 1988, when his series Chessmen was awarded the first prize in the Young European Photographer competition. This award was followed by an exhibition at the Ludwig Museum in Cologne, Germany in the same year. Deliberately disturbing and intended to raise awareness, Olaf committed himself in his earlier work on the subject of social exclusion in which he explored issues of class, race, sexual taste, beliefs, habits and grace. In his recent series Rain (2004), Hope (2005), Grief (2007) and Fall (2008) Olaf challenges the notion of domestic bliss. Dusk (2009) and Dawn (2010) show how culture can become repression, despite a beautiful appearance. A similar disengagement takes place in Olaf’s Hotel (2010) series in which he explores the subtle range of detached melancholic emotions in dimly-lit exquisitely furnished 1950s hotel rooms.

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf1

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf2

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf3

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf4

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf5

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf6

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf7

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf8

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf9

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf10

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf11

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf12

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf13

TheeBlog-ErwinOlaf14

www.erwinolaf.com





Leave a comment